2019 Four Continents. A journey through emotions

Shoma Uno in Anaheim. ©International Skating Union (ISU)

This is exactly what it says it is: a journey through emotions. Small drops into the ocean, with Honda Center in Anaheim being the ocean, for this year’s edition of Four Continents Championships.

So do not look for points, results or podium placements – you’ll only find them here and there, as tiny details in between tableaux.

Following us, you’ll get a sense of how these Championships have been for us – it’s a subjective recap, by all means –, what images have stayed with us when the curtains were closed, and 2019 Four Continents reached its end.

And you might find yourselves into our little stories.

by Florentina Tone

FIRST TABLEAU: A FLOWERY TRIPLE LOOP, THE MOON, THE RAIN

We think Ting Cui is a marvelous skater. Those arms, while skating to Rachmaninov’s “Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini”? Just beautiful. The triple Lutz? A joy. And her skating will be even more refined with the years and the maturity. But we like her already, we do.

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Eunsoo Lim is like the summer rain – so pure and so refreshing – and her commitment to music is truly commendable. No doubt about it, coach Rafael Arutunian has gold in his hands. And Jeffrey Buttle has done wonders with John Barry’s “Somewhere in Time”, one of the two pieces of music Yuna Kim suggested for Eunsoo’s short program.

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All the feels watching Mariah Bell’s SP in Anaheim, to Celine Dion’s “To Love You More” – she really wears her heart on her palms in this program choreographed by Adam Rippon. Emotions plus confidence – now that’s a winning package for Mariah, followed by a so deserved standing ovation.

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Apart from the popped Axel, that was a precious short program from Rika Kihira at Four Continents – moon floating over the lake. Courageous girl too, trying the put aside the whole hassle with the dislocated finger – protecting it, she pulls back her left hand from her coach’s hand and smiles with her at the boards, seconds before the skate.

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Kaori Sakamoto has been our revelation last season – and she’s our favorite lady this season. And her short program to Charlotte Church’s “From My First Moment” is liquid skating, we can’t resist being amazed by it. By it, by her, by this flowing presence in Anaheim. And those twizzles into the triple Loop, like the petals of a flower, embracing the jump? Maé-Bérénice Méité loved it (and recreated it too) – and we loved it as well.

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Sharp, on point, 100% commitment – Bradie Tennell nailed a flawless short program at 2019 Four Continents. And we can’t help but wondering if a suit with a more contemporary feel, and not a dress, wouldn’t have helped more in carrying this type of program. Thoughts aside, that was the best we’ve seen Bradie skate this SP.

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With Mai Mihara on the ice, eyes are happy, eyes are pleased. And the unfortunate landing of the second jump in the combo didn’t take away the magic of Mai’s skating. And yes, the music of her short program is called exactly that: “It’s Magic”. Or should we say “It’s Mai-gic”?

SECOND TABLEAU: THE PRINCE, GARY MOORE’S GUITAR, UNLEASHED BOYANG – AND A STAIRWAY TO HEAVEN

The cigarette, the flirtatious look, the smile – we’re fans of Nam Nguyen’s short program to Sinatra’s “That’s Life”. So many wonderful nuances in this program, and you can tell he has such a great base skating skills-wise.

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No doubt about it: Junhwan Cha’s short program qualifies as a big moment of this year’s edition of Four Continents, and his embodiment of the prince, in Cinderella’s story, gets better and better with every competition. We love his presence, the way he moves his arms, the openness – he’s such a talent. And Brian Orser offers the best description of his skate in Anaheim, greeting Junhwan at the boards: “That was really nice, relaxed”. And that right here is the exact word we were looking for: Junhwan looks really relaxed while skating, and with him everything looks easy.

“90 something will be nice”, Brian says while waiting for the scores, “100!”, someone from the audience shouts, prompting a laughter in the Kiss and Cry. And when the scores show up, and it’s a season best – 97.33 points, Brian shouts victoriously, as if he had just won a fight, on a battlefield: “Ha-ha-ha-ha!”

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So much expressiveness Kazuki Tomono carries while skating to music from the movie “Cinema Paradiso”, a short program choreographed by Misha Ge. And if, at the beginning of the season, the program was more Misha, Kazuki has now made it his. And he’s just so pleasant to watch, and definitely a skater for the future.

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If Keiji Tanaka decides to keep this short program for the rest of his competitive career, we will be happy, thrilled even: it’s like as if he were born to skate to Gary Moore’s beautiful, goose bumps-giver sound of the guitar. That is a match made in heaven, it really is – and we can’t take our eyes off Keiji while skating to it. And the step sequence is just fantastic – he looks so free, so loose, so liberated. We just need to say it one more time: he looks as he found the perfect music for his skating style. And so he did.

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Eyes are naturally drawn to Jason Brown, because Jason is class, Jason is imperial. And his skating has this wonderful sophistication, and beauty, and it is so very catching. And this short program to “Love is A Bitch”, choreographed by Rohene Brown, is a mirror of Jason’s skating, a display of his signature moves, a display of why he is called “king of transitions”. Too bad about the Axel – he can definitely nail that one – but we’re in love with the confident air this program breathes from top to finish.

He can be pleased: his process of transformation is going smoothly and, most importantly, it doesn’t change who he is. And he thrives on the big stage, he does.

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As soon as the music starts, Shoma Uno becomes one with it. And the thing about him is that he draws you with him, on the stairway to heaven. And he had his share of bad luck, and breaks, this season – with him spraining his ankle three times prior to Four Continents, but he’s here, and he’s fighting, in spite of not having the practice time he wanted. In Anaheim, he’s sharp and he’s commanding – it’s like his body screams: “I’m here – don’t dare to go away, don’t dare to look away”. And we don’t, we won’t. ’Cause this program creates a fantastic atmosphere.

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While skating to “Exogenesis Symphony” by Muse in his SP at Four Continents, you can tell Vincent Zhou spent a lot of time working on his jumps, to make sure he won’t, ever again, face some scores he doesn’t understand in the Kiss and Cry. And so a big part of his efforts went in this particular direction, making the overall short program less fluent, less liquid than he might have wanted to. But that was a great skate overall from Vincent, plenty of highlights in it – him thrusting in the air, here and there – and one that won him over 100 points for the first time in his career. A well deserved standing ovation followed, and Vincent Zhou was the overnight leader in Anaheim.

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With Keegan Messing you always have the impression he’s a kid having fun on his own little rink in the backyard – so playful he looks, so full of joy, of energy. As if he really owned the ice, and wanted to know all the possible tricks he could do with it. For all these reasons, his programs have this air of freedom, of (let loose) imagination – there’s nothing he can’t try, nothing he can’t do. And that’s exactly the case with this short program, to “You’ve Got a Friend in Me” – he’s having a blast while performing it for the audience at Four Continents.

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After that stunning triple Axel, the final jump of his SP, you can see the real Boyang Jin on the ice of Anaheim. “Unleashed Boyang” may be a better description, since he puts himself out there for the rest of the skate, the step sequence and all, and you can catch a glimpse of his real personality in this short program choreographed by Lori Nichol, with help from the skater himself: Boyang came up with the air guitar gesture in the program, and he’d confess, satisfied with the choreography process: “It turned out my crazy matches her [Lory’s] crazy”. And, yes, that is a good program for Boyang, highlighting his energy and inner self.

THIRD TABLEAU: “OOOOH, WHAT WE DID?”

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Oh, how much we missed them. And even with her mistake on the triple Toeloop, Wenjing Sui and Cong Han are imperial while skating to “No One Like You” by Red Electrick. Once they’re in full competitive mode, they’ll be top of the world again. Performance-wise, they already are.

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One thing is sure: we love this O-o-phe-li-a short program. And don’t be fooled by that (very unexpected) fall on the throw triple Loop: Cheng Peng and Yang Jin can (and will) do better. And they definitely thrive in this partnership.

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Go big or go home – and US champions, Ashley Cain and Timothy LeDuc, skated their hearts out at Four Continents. What a program, to “Bella Belle”, and they are fierce competitors.

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Oh, that was such an exquisite, nuanced short program from Kirsten Moore-Towers and Michael Marinaro at Four Continents. Beautiful blue dance to “The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face” by Leona Lewis – so glued they are, so in unison, so much they have progressed. And Kirsten’s reaction to the scores was precious – she clearly didn’t see it coming: them, finishing this particular segment of the pairs event on the first place. “Ooooh, what we did?”, she asks in amazement. And they did win the pairs SP in Anaheim, and deservedly so. And a small gold medal rewarded both the performance and their fluid skating.

FOURTH TABLEAU: YELLOW MOOD, THE LIONESS – AND A TANGO IN THE COLOUR OF CHAMPAGNE

“We’re in it for the long haul”, Laurence Fournier Beaudry and Nikolaj Sorensen said a couple of years ago – a true statement of intent – and them representing Canada starting this season is definitely a part of that (long) journey. And they are a stunning couple to watch, they are – and that’s so very obvious while performing their rhythm dance in Anaheim, to “Balada para mi muerte” and “Adios Nonino” by Astor Piazzolla. And that piano-passage in the dance, a joy to both the eyes and ears. In the Kiss and Cry, coaches are happy – and skaters are too.

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Kaitlin Hawayek and Jean-Luc Baker are thriving this season. And their coaching change – them heading to Montreal, as all the other American top teams – has made them a top team as well. It enhanced their qualities, and made them breathe an air of confidence they didn’t have up until now. This, plus a powerful tango – and you can guess why this was a great moment of the rhythm dance in Anaheim.

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Highly contagious tango from Piper Gilles and Paul Poirier at Four Continents – with them, it’s always about the story they tell, the mood they create. And that famous “I can’t take my eyes off you” seems to have been written especially for them.

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Madison Hubbell and Zachary Donohue’s tango in Anaheim: a pure, raw display of power. And she sells it, and we’ll take it. And they go straight into the lead with their fiery red dance to music by Astor Piazzolla.

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Fantastic tango, fantastic presence from Madison Chock and Evan Bates at Four Continents. As if she were a lioness following its prey – and all of us watched their “dance” on the edge of the seat. The audience responded enthusiastically, and a chorus of “Hurray!” followed them to the Kiss and Cry. “That was fun to watch”, Romain Haguenauer smiled, and we couldn’t agree more – we were stunned with the nuances, the boldness, them exuding power and fully embracing the character of the dance. They were ranked second – but that was a second place with a special sparkling around it, it almost felt like first.

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Kaitlyn Weaver and Andrew Poje: this tango, in the colour of champagne, is sheer class. And when it comes to class, there’s almost no one like them. And they are just fantastic to watch. Addictive even. And, like a precious diamond with so many facets, they enrich, embellish the world of skating.

FIFTH TABLEAU: MAI’S WINGS, THE QUAD SAL OUT OF NOWHERE – AND RIKA’S BEAUTIFUL STORM

Not a good day for Ting Cui jumping-wise – but what a discovery artistry-wise. She’s mature beyond her age, and knows how to project herself, and how to draw people to her. And “Giselle” is a wonderful choice of music, embracing her from tip to toe.

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Now that was a big moment of 2019 Four Continents, goose bumps and all. And you’re not mistaking: Mai Mihara DOES have wings, and we’re underneath them, in awe, in amazement. Floating, making almost no noise at all, she’s like the feather in her hair. Consider us fans.

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When Elizabet Tursynbaeva thrusts herself in the air, looking for a quadruple Salchow, you almost can’t believe it – you didn’t even know she was training the jump. She did, she does – and she attempts it in Anaheim, and little does she lack to land it. And the attempt gives her wings, while skating her tango – and that powerful, enthusiast skate, done with ease, intricacy, wins her a silver medal at Four Continents; a personal victory for Elizabet and a historical medal for Kazakhstan in the ladies event.

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The jumps were a bit off during her “Chicago” free skate, but the presence, oh my. Eunsoo Lim is a star.

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Rika Kihira’s free skate is like an embroidery. But one that’s done with power, and perfect control. And her “beautiful storm” has definitely been one of the highlights of this year’s edition of Four Continents. And we need to say hats off to Tom Dickson for choreographing the piece. So many nuances and layers there, and rain, and thunders, and lightning – and Rika does a marvelous job portraying the storm. In the Kiss and Cry, when rain has ended, she happily chit-chats with Mie Hamada, embracing a plushy bear – and her scores in Anaheim, 153.14 points, surely eye to the Worlds in Saitama.

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What an improvement in terms of expression for Bradie Tenell – she seems a new person this season: an overall air of refinement surrounds her free skate to “Romeo and Juliet” by Sergei Prokofiev, and more commitment than ever to the characters she portrays.

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We are in love with Kaori Sakamoto. We are. Not a perfect free skate in Anaheim, in her second Four Continents, but she fought, and flew, and took us with her. And wherever she might take us, we’re ready to follow her. And we did feel for her for losing a medal – the 2018 Four Continents champion missed the podium by 0.33 points.

SIXTH TABLEAU: RAIN, IN YOUR BLACK EYES

They nailed this program, Ashley Cain and Timothy LeDuc, they did – and they are on a roll this season. Newly crowned US Champions, they made themselves proud with not one, but two great skates at Four Continents. And, remember, all of these come after what was a disturbing, frightening incident at Golden Spin in Zagreb – kudos to them and their team for surpassing it and breathing new life into their partnership.

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Cheng Peng and Yang Jin’s free skate to Patricia Kaas’ “La vie en rose” is like a (mauve) bubble of emotion. One that keeps you on the edge of the seat from the first seconds till the very end. And she’s a marvelous storyteller, Cheng Peng – she caught our eyes when she skated with Hao Zhang, but she only blossomed in the presence of Yang Jin. And we might have said a thing or two, when it comes to splitting two perfectly capable pairs a couple of years ago, but this particular partnership, Peng/Jin, grew up to become one of the strongest out there, with wonderful connection, and catching stories to tell.

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This program had us open-mouthed, with wonder, with amazement. Wenjing Sui and Cong Han skate to “Rain, In Your Black Eyes” by Ezio Bosso – hats off to whoever envisioned the match – and Wenjing’s eyes are closed while waiting for the first notes of the piano. It’s maybe the sole moment of quietness – ours, theirs – ’cause our hearts starts racing soon after: what a program, screaming novelty and innovations, what a way to reinvent themselves at the beginning of a new Olympic cycle. They could have chosen a classical music hit for their FS – as they did in the past with Turandot, Francesca da Rimini or Samson and Delilah – but instead they decided to go classic-contemporary. And had us marveled to the fingertips.

No doubt about it, Wenjing and Cong are the real deal – and watching them for the next years, on their journey to a much wanted gold medal in Beijing, will be our (undisguised) joy. [And we’ll have the program on repeat, as a preparation for Worlds.] Plus: Cong Han hugging Hongbo Zhao with an additional pair of plushy, red hands, what a funny, sweet moment.

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Highly energetic Pink Floyd program from Kirsten Moore-Towers and Michael Marinaro, done with speed, conviction, character. They rose to expectations, and delivered – and that was a great way to end the pairs event at 2019 Four Continents. And, with all the nuances here and there, this looked less like a pairs program, and more like a dance one. And those 0.06 of a point separating them from the gold medal will be a powerful incentive to continue to progress – that ambitious they are, and that hard working.

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And a lovely moment staying with us when everything has ended: Wenjing Sui wishing everyone to be healthy in order to skate, and enjoy it, in the New Chinese Year, while sitting in the Kiss and Cry for the winners’ interview. Her teary eyes spoke for themselves – health has been her major concern the last couple of seasons, with major surgeries to have, and overcome. And now she’s on her way back to fully enjoying skating again.

SEVENTH TABLEAU: GOLDEN SHOMA

A breath of fresh air Donovan Carrillo is, and not only music-wise (I don’t know if we ever heard “Ya lo se que tu te vas” by Juan Gabriel in men’s skating before), but it’s so nice to have a skater from Mexico on the big stage. And he kept the program alive in spite of the falls, and he also had some very nice choreographic touches here and there. Plus: he got a sombrero in the end, and such an enthusiastic cheer from the audience.

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Not a good day for Kazuki Tomono’s jumps, but he sold the step sequence and the choreo sequence, he did, and “Riverdance” is always a hit. And his enthusiasm is truly catching. In the Kiss and Cry he looked really sad though, tears sparkling in his eyes, wiping them and hiding them at the same time.

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Eyes are drawn to Tomoki Hiwatashi in his debut at Four Continents: he put a free skate in Anaheim that was both great and extremely intriguing. A lot of highlights too, Russian split, Ina Bauer, him jumping clockwise, lots of energy throughout the program – what a performance from Tomoki, and the response of the audience testifies to that. A big moment in his career, a big moments of 4CC.

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The shirt-incident, him unbuttoning more then one button at the beginning of the program, was surely disconcerting for Nam Nguyen. He just couldn’t put it aside – and, mind at the buttons, at finding solutions, the program seemed to have slipped between his fingers. And we feel for him – because the start was fantastic, with a glorious 4S-3T, and because Nam has this wonderful skating style, and he’s always a joy to the eyes. Hoping for a rebound at Worlds.

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Big, big moment at Four Continents: Keiji Tanaka skating to his true potential. And the relief that came with that – his relief, our relief; we knew he had it in him. And he was on fire during his “Wilhelm Tell” free skate in Anaheim, and we absolutely loved seeing him perform like that. He doubled the Flip and singled a Salchow in combination, not to enter the boards, but all the rest was just fantastic – the speed, the energy, the stamina.

And he truly fed with the good things in the program, and the dramatic character of the music – and that was such a big step for him, putting it together in a free skate (the short one has been more of his ally until now). The audience stood up deservedly – and Takahito Mura, in the background, at the boards, did the same. And now Keiji knows he can do it – and that kind of validation will serve him big time.

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For four entire minutes we were in Shoma Uno’s world. A world where every movement takes its time, matures, completes itself, a world in which no gesture, not even the tiniest one, is rushed. A world where Shoma leads the way, and owns every second of his “Moonlight Sonata”. A world breathing calm and confidence, a world where little Shoma Uno from 2014 Junior Worlds in Sofia becomes a big boy – and wins the first major gold medal of his senior career. Silvery sparkling Shoma becomes golden Shoma, but he doesn’t lose his patina of noblesse. He has done it, and he can finally breathe a sigh of relief.

But, hands and knees on the ice, at the end of the skate, he doesn’t know he’s golden yet. And stays modest even in the quick quotes area: “There are skaters after me that have great potential to surpass my score”. A few days later, asked about what’s different, when coming back to Japan with a gold medal around his neck, he’ll answer Shoma-style: the number of journalists is now bigger.

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What a terrific free skate from Keegan Messing in Anaheim – and you feel for him for not clinching to a medal after such a performance. ’Cause he has this wonderful ownership of the ice – he moves with such easiness, he’s so relaxed, people don’t have this easy way of moving even on the ground. He DOES know the ice Keegan, he’s friends with it, and does marvelous things while on it. And his free skate at Four Continents was such a great moment of the men’s event, and the audience acknowledged it. And he’ll take this home with him, alongside a small bronze medal for his embodiment of Charlie Chaplin.

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Jason Brown might have left a couple of points on the table in Anaheim, but his free skate was really a statement of intent. It said, loud and clear: Don’t dare to count me out. I’m here, and I’m good at what I do. And Jason is really good at what he does – he masters the ice in a way a few skaters can. He even mastered this free skate that he didn’t feel connected to at the start – and the free skate holds now so many of his signature skills. He made it his throughout the season, and he made us watch it, eyes amazed. And, from where we stand, the program does him good: it puts him in a different setting, one that he’s not familiar with, but one that is good for the metamorphosis process he is in. And the rather noisy part, music-wise, in the middle of the program might just be a metaphor of this change – with the joy, the silence, the equilibrium that follow after.

Sitting in the middle at the arena, people clapping, on their feet, Jason looks happy and relieved. “You had fun”, Brian hugs him. “Good for you – we’re getting there”, Tracy adds, while Jason, catching his breath, makes a visual representation of the “baby steps”-phase he’s in.

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Not fully there in terms of matureness of movements, but so, so there in terms of commitment, and energy invested in the performance. And Vincent Zhou’s “Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon” was one of those performances requiring full energy, and he did just that. He put himself out there – with an insanely technical content as well – to make this free skate count. And he did that to the point of having almost no air at the end of the program. But he did it, and he made himself proud. And though the technical scores would eventually drop – some of the jumps stayed unfinished, you could tell – Vincent has just had a major skate at a major championships. And went home with a medal and tons of confidence.

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Junhwan Cha’s “Romeo and Juliet” will stay as one of the iconic skates of the post-Olympic season. As will the iconic scream, „Junlieeeet!”, in the middle of the skate – making a perfect line for the banners supporting Junhwan at all events. As will Junhan’s complete abandonment to the music in the final part of his skate at Four Continents.

And the truth is this is a marvelous program, masterfully choreographed by Shae-Lynn Bourne to fit Junhwan, and one bringing him tons of success this season. And, in spite of some little glitches here and there, that was a great skate from Junhwan in Anaheim, in a group where all skaters performed almost their very best. He has truly matured Junhwan, the competitions this season played an important part in it – and the future can only bring better performances, better versions of himself.

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This flamenco free skate seems such an essential step in Boyang Jin’s career – kudos to both him and Lori Nichol for going with this theme at the debut of the new Olympic cycle. For starters, it shows him ready to meet the challenge and go deeper interpretation-wise. It also shows him capable of taking risks – flamenco music is not for everyone. Plus, this is a major theme overall, cause “Hable con Ella” is such a powerful, emotional movie, one that needs to be understood in order to be portrayed. Of course, here and there you feel he needs more sophistication, movements still need to be refined to meet the demands of music, but he is definitely on the right track.

The program shows new facets of Boyang – but, most of all, it shows him eager to progress. And did he go for a quintuple in the start? The height of that Lutz was just fantastic!

EIGHTH TABLEAU: ANGELS, STARRY NIGHT – AND A GLOWING FREE DANCE. LITERALLY

Misato Komatsubara and Tim Koleto’s free dance is pure emotion – and one of our favorites this season. Two birds flying, following each other – this music is so, so good for them, and we love watching them skate to it. It is as if we saw them for the first time, as if they breathed a new life into this (relatively) new partnership – and kudos to whoever chose the “Love Story” theme for them. It suits them to the feathers.

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Stunned with the unison of Kaitlin Hawayek and Jean-Luc Baker, with their organicity, fluidity. They do look like they form one body, with such a generous range of movements – and, watching them skate their free dance, I am lost in the rainbow. That much I like them – that beautiful they are when they skate, each, a mirror of the other. Have been a fan of these two since their “Amelie” free dance at Junior Worlds, when they won the crown in Sofia, in 2014, and it has been a privilege to watch them fly, watch them grow.

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The emotional load Kaitlyn Weaver and Andrew Poje’s free dance carries is so huge that you finish watching it with a lump in your throat, and eyes full of tears. But it’s not only because it reminds you of Denis’ disappearance, but because this is such a beautiful message of love, of hope. And this message directs to how beautiful a person Denis was, but also showcases the class, the elegance, the noblesse in Kaitlyn and Andrew’s skating. It’s like watching an angel fly – Kaitlyn in her fluttery white dress – carefully protected by Andrew, sparkles on his shoulders.

And this dance right here is the whole reason we love these two for years on end.

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Watching Piper Gilles and Paul Poirier’s “Starry Night”, my heart is full. It is as if they became a part of the painting, and a part of Van Gogh’s life. They truly are a part – they are the storytellers. And I am so moved while watching them skate, and so grateful to have them continue to innovate, in spite of some people not getting it – the talent and the innovations – fully.

But, as the song goes, “They would not listen, they did not know how. Perhaps they’ll listen now” – perhaps this free skate will act as an awakening call. Because these two – Piper and Paul – are treasures. And treasures are meant to be kept and, yes, treasured. And I know I am, I know I will. And this free dance is a beauty – probably, years from now, my most vivid recollection when it comes to their skating, and one of my most vivid recollection of the post-Olympic season.

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You know what? The biggest change in Madison Chock and Evan Bates after moving to Canada to train is him, Evan: he’s right there in the program, thriving, and living almost a second life. ’Cause only now I understand I didn’t see him that much before. True, all of our eyes were naturally drawn to her, because Madison is such a star, but now we’re seeing him more, we’re noticing him more. Evan is not just a secondary character in the story, he’s having a leading role now, and this free dance highlights him dearly. And their “Fever” free dance is sexy, beautiful, flirtatious and addictive. Yes, all of the above.

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The thing is, with this “Romeo and Juliet” free dance – which is not a contemporary story, and the type of story they excel at – Madison Hubbell and Zachary Donohue have to put a lot of extra energy in it, to make it credible. And coming after such a stunning, sexy free dance last year, “Romeo and Juliet” seemed a bit difficult to handle at the beginning of this season. And so they made a couple of changes, added some extra energy, emotions here and there – and in Anaheim, a month before Worlds, the story really seemed to come together. And they put themselves out there, as if they were indeed Romeo and Juliet, and, for four minutes, you almost forgot we live in 2019. Too bad about that stationary-not-so stationary lift though – making them lose a lot of points, and having them finish outside the podium at 2019 Four Continents.

OTHER HIGHLIGHTS THIS SEASON:
Javier Fernández’s farewell – and the other big moments of the Europeans